Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Forts in Knoxville Part One

South of the River





Soon after the raising of the siege at Knoxville, General Burnside issued an order which was read to each regiment of his army and of which the following is an extract the balance of the order including names of some officers of other States.


Fort Dickerson

(1863-1865) - A Union Civil War Fort established in 1863 in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. Named Fort Dickerson in G.O. 37 (Army of the Ohio), 11 Dec 1863 after Captain Jonathan Calvin Dickerson, 112th Illinois Volunteer Mounted Infantry, who was killed 18 Sep 1863 near Cleveland, Tennessee. Burial: Link Fort abandoned in 1865 at the end of the war.
  • 15-16 Nov 1863 - Repulsed assaults by 5,000 Confederate Cavalry.
  • Nov-Dec 1863 - Withstood the Siege of Knoxville.
  • Nov 1863 - Provided artillery support for the Battles of Armstrong’s Hill
Jonathan Calvin Dickerson was born on 8 May 1832 to Benjamin Dickerson and Elizabeth Shafer in Ulster County, New York. He married Ceonelia Deyo on 28 May 1863. They had one son, who was not born until after Captain Dickerson died.
Capt Dickerson was the first officer of the 112th Illinois Volunteer Mounted Infantry who was killed.

He was a brave, daring leader, an honorable and conscientious officer, and a generous, noble hearted man. In a conversation with the author upon the chances of war, but a short time before his death, he declared he would never surrender to a rebel; that he would fight to the death rather than be captured; and in this, as in all things else, he kept his word. By order of Gen Burnside a fort in Knoxville was named Fort Dickerson, in honor of his brave death. He was buried in the cemetery at Cleveland and after the war, a fitting monument was erected to his memory by his widow. 

Battery Fearns
 
On the East side of Flint Hill. The breast height is entirely revetted eighteen embrasures finished and fourteen partly revetted About one quarter of the parapet should be raised two feet. The gateway is unfinished platforms for twenty-nine guns are required. This fort had a large well ventilated magazine.


Named Battery Fearns in G.O. 37, 11 Dec 1863 (Army of the Ohio), after Lieutenant Charles W. Fearns, Adjutant 45th Ohio Mounted Infantry, who was killed in action at Fort Sanders on 18 Nov 1963. He was married to Sarah J Tremble





General Orders Headquarters Army of the Ohio

No 37 Knoxville Tenn Dec 21 1863

In order to designate more clearly the positions occupied by our troops during the recent siege and in token of respect to the gallant officers who fell in the defense of Knoxville the several forts and batteries are named as follows:
 
Battery Noble At Loop holed house (35.9547, -83.9311), now Melrose Place, south of Kingston road in memory of Adjutant William Noble 2d Michigan Volunteers who fell in the charge upon the enemy's rifle pits in front of Fort Sanders on the morning of November 24th. 



Fort Byington At College Hill (now the University of Tennessee) after Major Cornelius Byington 2d Michigan Volunteers who fell mortally wounded while leading the assault upon the enemy's rifle pits in front of Fort Sanders on the morning of November 24th 
 
Battery Galpin East of Second creek (35.9658, -83.9244) in memory of Lieutenant Galpin 2d Michigan Volunteers who fell in the assault upon the enemy's rifle pits in front of Fort Sanderson the morning of November 24th

Fort Comstock Battery Gapin and Battery Wiltsie

 
Fort Comstock On Summit Hill near the railroad depot in memory of Lieutenant Colonel Comstock 17th Michigan Volunteers who fell in our lines during the siege 
 
Battery Wiltsie West of Gay street in memory of Captain Wiltsie 20th Michigan Volunteers who was mortally wounded in our lines during the siege 




 
Fort Huntington Smith On Temperance Hill in memory of Lieutenant Colonel Huntington Smith 20th Michigan Volunteers who fell at the battle of Campbell's Station 
Fort Huntington Smith, Battery CLifton Lee and Battery Stearman

 
Battery Zoellner Between Fort Sanders and Second creek in memory of Lieutenant Frank Zoellner 2d Michigan Volunteers who fell mortally wounded in the assault upon the enemy's rifle pits in front of Fort Sanders on the morning of November 24th.


 
Battery Billingsley Between Gay street and First creek in memory of Lieutenant J Billingsley 17th Michigan Infantry who fell in the action in front of Fort Sanders November 20th 

 
********************************************************************************
By command of
Lewis Richmond AAG (p478)                      MAJOR GENERAL BURNSIDE 

Battery Noble: Lieutenant William Noble,
2nd Mich. Inf. Civil War
Buried Elmwood Cemetery, Wayne County, Michigan Link

Wm Noble Marker


Fort Byington: Major Cornelius Byington
2nd Mich. Inf. Civil War   
Cornelius Byington was born in March 1829 to Delia Storrs and Joel Byington. 
Buried Oak Hill Cemetery, Battle Creek,Calhoun County,Michigan

Cornelius Byington Marker



Battery Galpin: Lieutenant Charles R Galpin 

2nd Michigan Volunteers

Charles R Galpin was born in New York to William and Louisa Hakes Galpin. They moved to Michigan when Charles was a young boy. 
 Buried Knoxville National Cemetery 






Fort Comstock: Lieutenant Colonel Lorin L Comstock  

17th Michigan Volunteers
Born on 2 July 1824 in Farmington, Ontario, New York. He Married Lucinda Minnis on 28 September 1856 in Washtenaw, Michigan. Burial: Link
Loren Comstock Marker

 



 

 

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